Feature Story

For most of their life, Valentina Zhakupbekova and her family have depended on Kazakhstan’s vast wetlands to survive. Her husband helped support their family of four children with the fish he caught until he passed away. Left without a job and with a family to feed, she learned about a GEF/UNDP workshop that taught how to create felt textile products made from wool, a commodity in abundant supply in her town.

English

In Almaty, the residents of a 56-apartment building built in the 1960s are happier because they can finally be more comfortable in wintertime. 

But it was not always the case," said Ms. Irina Valyshova of the Maksat CAO Residents Association. "I used to receive complaints everyday because the apartments were too hot or too cold, and because the energy bills were rising.

English

Indigenous and traditional communities everywhere have special relationships with the natural environment they live in. Fishermen, cattle-breeders, farmers, they rely on land and water for their livelihoods. Drastic changes in climate have devastating impact on their lives and adapting to them is especially difficult if a community lives in a war-torn country like Afghanistan.

Undefined

April 7, 2016 - Located in the lush Arima Valley in the northern region of Trinidad, the Asa Wright Nature Centre (AWNC) is a nonprofit trust established in 1967 and one of the first established in the Caribbean. Its goal is to "protect part of the Arima Valley in a natural state and to create a conservation and study area for the protection of wildlife and for the enjoyment of all."

English

The GEF’s support of this project in Morocco helped the further adoption of solar technology across the globe.

In 1999, there were no iPhones, no social media, and landlines were used to connect to the internet. The euro was just born, the first Matrix movie hit theatres, and everyone was waiting for the end of the world that computers were supposed to cause at the change of the millennium.

English

A blog by Andrew Steer, President and CEO, World Resources Institute; and Naoko Ishii, CEO and Chairperson, Global Environment Facility*

 

English

The Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem

The meeting point between Namibia’s hot desert sands and the cold Benguela ocean current harbours rich biodiversity and some of the most abundant marine life concentrations in the world. The Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem (BCLME) stretches northwards from South Africa, along Namibia’s entire coastline, into Angola.

English

Despite its arid lands, Namibia is rich in biodiversity. To date, it has 20 state-run protected areas comprising nearly 17% of the country's total land area. These protected areas are a centerpiece of Namibia's tourism industry, which in turn sustainably supports the country's economic development.

EXPANDING BEYOND THE CONCEPT OF 'BOUNDARY PROTECTION'

English