Feature Story

Polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, were among the original so-called “dirty dozen” chemicals that are controlled by the Stockholm Convention, an international environmental treaty that aims to eliminate or restrict the production and use of persistent organic pollutants (POPs).  While the production of PCB has long been stopped, it continues to be used in power generation and transmission systems even up to today.

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Everything from the food we eat, to our homes and buildings, and even our health, is under attack from pests.  Pests not only cause economic loss, but also can transmit diseases.  In our attempt to keep these pests at bay, we have developed an arsenal of pesticides, which are highly toxic chemicals.  Some of these fall into a group of chemicals that are regarded as the most harmful due to their severely adverse and long-lasting impact on human health and the environment.  This group of chemicals, the Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are controlled by the Stockholm Co

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Poorly regulated gold mining is spreading around the world. Every day, millions of artisanal and small-scale gold miners work extremely hard in often poor conditions and without the protective framework of formal labour market standards. By evening the vast majority have harvested only miniscule amounts of gold, if anything at all. But the economic incentives are still attractive.

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Christiana Figueres, former executive secretary UNFCCC and convenor, Mission 2020

We are at a precarious point for the fate of the global commons. Our actions on climate protection over the next few years will determine whether we continue on a path of exponentially growing national disasters or pivot onto a path toward a safer, more prosperous world.

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Efforts to grow irrigated rice in Mwea, located about 100 kilometers northeast of Nairobi, Kenya, began under British colonial rule. Today more than 3,000 families live within the “Scheme”, of which half is devoted to rice cultivation. The paddies are submerged for at least six months out of the year, providing an ideal habitat for mosquitoes. One species of these mosquitoes — Anopheles arabiensis — is a vector for malaria.

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Mary Robinson, president, Mary Robinson Foundation – Climate Justice

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In the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan, the country’s rich biodiversity includes some 200 species of medicinal plants.

The intricate linkages between Bhutan’s rich culture and natural heritage has created a vibrant tradition of sustainably using local ecosystems’ genetic resources and preserving the vast stores of traditional knowledge held by local communities.

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By Keith Tuffley, managing partner and CEO, the B Team

Two months ago I had the good fortune of falling into a collapsing crevasse on the Antarctic ice cap while on an expedition from the Ross ice shelf to the south pole. Good fortune? Yes, because – apart from the fact that I survived – I had the experience of seeing first-hand the thickness of the ice covering the frozen continent.

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The Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation in Tanzania (CCBRT) is one of the few hospitals that provides disability and rehabilitation services to the country’s indigenous population.

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By Mary Ellen Iskenderian, president and CEO, Women's World Banking

Over the past 30 years, the world has seen unprecedented economic growth and a digital revolution that could help solve our most pressing social and environmental challenges. Yet despite this, our current model of development is deeply flawed, threatening our global sustainability.

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