Blog

Since it was signed 20 years ago, the Stockholm Convention has helped countries throughout the world to carefully manage the use, storage, distribution, and disposal of a particularly dangerous group of hazardous chemicals, the persistent organic pollutants or POPs. 

In an article for the Davos Agenda 2021, GEF CEO and Chairperson Carlos Manuel Rodriguez says a renewed focus on easing pressures on nature through a green and blue recovery has breathed new life into upcoming negotiations on biodiversity loss, land degradation, ocean conservation, and climate change. He writes that the right kind of recovery package can offer employment as well as environmental promise, if governments pair reform of damaging subsidies with their support for sustainable industries and nature-based solutions such as reforestation.

Temperatures in the Sahel are increasing 1.5 times faster than the global average, and around 80 percent of the farmland has lost some degree of its natural productivity. Together, these factors diminish the availability of land for food production or grazing, deplete water, and increase the vulnerability of the people living in the region. 

Alignment between policy, finance, and technology is spurring a rapid shift to a new kind of economic development

Since the landmark Paris Agreement of 2015, there has been a dramatic increase in private sector interest and action related to climate change. In just five years, hundreds of companies have set targets to reach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and have outlined science-informed plans to achieve them.

José Koechlin, founder and chief executive of Inkaterra, explains how his pioneering business model benefits everything from Machu Picchu to fans of Paddington Bear

Tourism is not only a source of inspiration; it’s a human right. We need to travel, to move, to experience the diversity of culture and nature abroad. Travel makes us wiser, and more sensitive. It allows us to feel free. And after months of lockdown due to COVID-19, everyone is anxious to set sail again. Bucket lists will survive the pandemic.

“Normal” was destroying our health and prosperity. We cannot afford to return to it after COVID-19

It has been almost a year since COVID-19 began to emerge. We are learning how to contain the virus better and good progress is being made on vaccines. And while many countries continue to face long and difficult lockdowns, many are hopeful that the world can start returning to some semblance of normal next year.

Laurence Tubiana, CEO, European Climate Foundation, was one of the architects of the successful Paris climate summit in 2015. Here, she calls on Britain to deliver a similar breakthrough next year

Reducing carbon emissions and protecting biodiversity makes companies more resilient to shocks, more relevant to society and more valuable to investors

The year 2020 has been defined by the COVID-19 pandemic that has disrupted lives and livelihoods everywhere around the world. The way we work has been interrupted and altered. This is true for those working to advance and manage international environmental projects and programs – it is also true for the professionals working to evaluate for effectiveness and impact of those initiatives. At the GEF Independent Evaluation Office (IEO), the body I lead, we have had to innovate in our data collection and analysis to counter the travel and other limitations posed by the situation.