Feature Story

English

Before you can stop deforestation, you have to know what’s causing it. And in the case of tropical forests, the answer is clear: Most deforestation is driven by commercial agriculture, namely the production of palm, soy, timber and cattle – the so-called “big four” commodities.

Spanish

“Hace 20 años, en otoño hacía frío y pescábamos pulpo. Ahora, el clima ha cambiado y no hemos podido pescar. No sabemos qué hacer, pero necesitamos soluciones concretas para vivir en mejores condiciones.” – Jamal Zayoud, pescador, Djerba

Djerba y la mayoría del litoral de Túnez enfrentan un nivel de presión ambiental sin precedentes debido al cambio climático, que se agrava por el hecho de que las actividades humanas y las economías locales dependen en especial de los ecosistemas costeros.

English

Halima Ousseïni is just 16 years old. The world should be hers. Yet, living in the village of Tanout, Niger, where climate change impacts, political instability, gender inequality and poverty are commonplace, life is not easy for Halima.

English

Tunisia’s coastal zone teems with life. It is a densely populated area, with most of the country’s large cities, and two-thirds of its people. With its varied topography and an irregular 1,445km of continental coastline extended from the North to the East, plus 450km of island coastline, the coastal zone is a vital habitat for both humans and marine biodiversity.

English

The skyline of Da Nang, with its high-rise buildings, modern bridges, and miles of clean and manicured oceanfront, leaves little doubt that the city’s economy is thriving. Over the last three decades, Viet Nam’s central government has made it their mission to transform this coastal city into a dynamic center, destined to become a cultural, commercial and industrial focus for the country and East Asian region.

English

India is the second largest producer of fish in the world, and, for most of the country’s coastal communities, the sea has always provided their food and income. In recent decades, greater demand for fish, driven by a growing population, changing market forces, and increased commercial fishing activity (including illegal fishing) to meet global fish demands, has resulted in serious supply shortfalls.

English

At the apex of the Coral Triangle lies the Philippines, comprising over 7,500 islands, with a coastline of some 36,285 km, and surrounded by six different seas. These waters are ranked third in the world in terms of marine biodiversity, hosting more than 460 reef-building coral species, the global epicentre of shorefish diversity, and a wide range of habitats that include 123 marine key biodiversity areas, which are recognized as being of international importance for biodiversity conservation.

English

In the past, inadequate regional planning and uncoordinated exploitation of marine and coastal resources has had detrimental effects on the functioning and sustainability of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem. A key outcome of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem Programme has been the establishment of a multisectoral, intergovernmental body to drive an ecosystem approach to governance of this valuable, shared ecosystem – this is the Benguela Current Commission.

English

All ecosystems can absorb a certain amount of change, yet still remain functional. However, beyond a certain threshold, loss of biodiversity and disruption of ecosystem functioning has negative impacts on biodiversity and the flow of ecosystem services, with serious consequences for human well-being and livelihoods. Disrupted ecosystems, and the people who depend on them, are more vulnerable to shocks and disturbances, such as those caused by climate change.

English

Cold, slow, and bursting with life – this is the Humboldt Current, a stream of sub-Antarctic water that flows in a northerly direction along the coasts of Chile and Peru, before veering westward across the Pacific to bathe the Galapágos Islands. These nutrient-rich waters support some of the densest populations of fish found anywhere in the world – millions of anchovies, sardines and jack mackerel provide food for an extraordinary abundance of other marine fauna both at sea and on the shore.